Categories
books

Brian Sibley’s Signed Books – Adventures of Tom Bombadil

Quite a few Christmases ago, my uncle Dennis gave our family a copy of The Hobbit radio-play on tape. A few years after that I learned that the Hobbit had a great sequel called, “The Lord of the Rings”. I loved the books and enjoyed BBC Radio 4’s 26-part adaptation of that one too.

In the credits of each episode I kept hearing the producers name and one day, on a lark, I decided to look him up. I discovered Brian Sibley’s blog which is full of interesting reading.

During my first reading of The Lord of the Rings, I remember not even liking the parts with Tom Bombadil when I first encountered the enigmatic figure. I didn’t get the weirdness of it all — who was this guy and why was he slowing down what was otherwise turning out to be a pretty great adventure? When I talked to friends who were fans of the book they encouraged me to expand my mind and appreciate the poetry, novelty, and esoteric nature of the character. Hearing that they loved Tom Bombadil made me reconsider my own opinion and I even found myself being disappointed when it was cut from the radio-play and subsequent movie.

But, it appears Mr. Sibley didn’t make the cuts lightly and eventually tried to make things right. From his post about his signed copy of The Adventures of Tom Bombadil he explains:

in 1992, eleven years after the BBC radio dramatisation of The Lord of the Rings, I attempted to make my peace with those fans who had been so outraged at the character’s omission from the original broadcasts. I created a six-part series for BBC Radio 5, based on Tolkien’s shorter fiction and, alongside Farmer Giles of Ham, Smith of Wootton Major and Leaf by Niggle, included The Adventures of Tom Bombadil which was, essentially, the previously-ignored chapters from The Lord of the Rings…

I’m going to add it to my long list of audio I’d like to listen to on my way to work.

Categories
movie

The Hunt for Gollum

I, for one, am really looking forward to the Peter Jackson-Guillermo del Toro two-part film based on The Hobbit, but in the meantime fans of Middle-earth have taken it upon themselves to create a prequel of their own, with The Hunt for Gollum.

The 40-minute film based on J R R Tolkien’s appendices to The Lord of the Rings fills in some of the untold events that befell between the end of The Hobbit (with Mr Bilbo Baggins having unwittingly carried off the One Ring from its then ‘owner’, Gollum) and the beginning of the saga of the War of the Ring as recounted in The Fellowship of the Ring.

What is most amazing is that the filmmakers have managed to produce their film for a mere $500.

“The Hunt For Gollum is an unofficial non-profit film made for private use, and is not intended for sales of any sort. No money is being made from this film, and no one was paid to make it.”

The Hunt for Gollum is easily the highest quality fan movie I’ve ever seen. Lord of the Rings fans will love the incredible 40 minutes, as it depicts Strider’s adventure in gathering clues about the coming horde by tracking down Gollum. Almost as if pulled from cut scenes out of the Peter Jackson trilogy, if you’re a fan, you’ll probably not want to miss this.

Here’s the trailer:

I’d like to see them make one about the cleansing of the shire, but in the meantime, you can watch The Hunt for Gollum online (for free) right now.